Education and Exercises – The Cornerstone of Physical Therapy

“If your therapist only does a ‘treatment’ to you and misses out the ‘get it moving/ rehab/ graded recovery / functional recovery process – then its my opinion that your therapist is a complete waste of time”

Louis Gifford
Aches and Pains P.159

In his article Chiropractic and Osteopathy – How do they work?, respected physiotherapist from UK, Adam Meakins wrote:

The lines between physiotherapy, chiropractic and osteopathy have become blurred. As physiotherapists we should be giving only education and exercise-based advice. We believe in self-management, giving patients ownership to get themselves better and not looking for repeat business.

Indeed, the past few years we have seen the crossover of practices among many different rehabilitation specialists. While I don’t have anything against chiropractors or osteopaths, there has got to be distinguishing line somewhere. Good thing, there is… Physical therapists are well known in constantly educating their patients and keeping them actively part in the rehabilitation process instead of just keeping them passive, with the practitioner doing all the work.

Education.

A good physical rehabilitation practitioner must be able to educate their clients/patients properly. Education starts with discussing the underlying condition as accurately as possible. What and where is the problem? Why does the problem exist? Many times patients come to physical therapy to have assurance that there is nothing particularly a major problem with their [insert musculoskeletal problem here]… In the discussion, it is important that the clinician uses non-threatening words to make sure that what we tell our  patients won’t cause a nocebo effect. Nocebo is a detrimental effect on health or symptoms produced by psychological or pyschosomatic factors. In rehabilitation medicine, these factors involve mainly the words that we use when discussing with patients their conditions.

nocebo

“A massive fear inducing nocebo” – Ben Cormack, Physiotherapist

Nocebo effect is particularly common in pain management. Even well trained clinicians use inappropriate words that cause more harm than help to pain patients. Sometimes, these inappropriate words are used intentionally to encourage the patient to to sign up for long term treatments. This happens when the patient is made to believe that some things are wrong with their body and they need a regular or at least a long term, repeated fix. Examples of these are: spinal vertebrae being out of place that need some long term adjustments, some muscular imbalances that need repeated correcting, core muscles being weak causing recurring low back pain… the list could go on! [More about this in future blog, but there already numerous articles regarding these issues].

But what is so threatening with these words? In their article, The Nocebo Effect: How Your Power of Suggestion May Harm Your Clients, Matt Danzinger, a personal trainer and Jonathan Fass, an orthopedic physical therapist wrote:

Words like “fat, scrawny, or weak” are words that harm. Words like “damaged” or “broken,” phrases such as “you’re going to be injured,” or “you don’t move right” can destroy what you are trying to build.

Telling a patient they have degenerating discs, bad posture, displaced sacrum, etc. can be perceived as threat by the brain. And when the brain perceives a threat, real or imagined, pain is produced. Imagine if everyday our patients believe that their posture is bad, they have a bulging disc, their knees are degenerating. How would the brain react to these catastrophic thoughts? We know now that pain and tissue damage are not always correlated. Unfortunately, pathologizing posture and movements is very common and rampant in musculoskeletal medicine resulting in fear-avoidance behavior and catastrophic thinking. I’m not saying that discs or joint degenerations are not real, just not causative factors of many recurring or chronic pain conditions. [Again, this topic needs a totally separate article].

In other words, educating patients regarding their condition is essential part of physical therapy practice. But more important still is to say the right words that are more helpful than harmful.

Exercises.

Prescribing appropriate rehabilitative and therapeutic exercises is one of the most important parts of a real physical therapy program. It is prescribed both in the clinic and as part of patient’s daily home program. Very often, they are prescribed as graded movement exposure wherein the exercises prescribed depend on the patient’s capacity and tolerance at the time of treatment. These exercises are also specific to the patient’s underlying problem – acute injury, non-specific pain, or presence of pathological condition.

While other specialists may administer mainly passive treatment to “fix” the client’s problem/s, physical therapists make use of the therapeutic effects of exercises to relieve pain, increase range of motion, strengthen muscles and improve movement. That’s right, graded movement exposure can actually help relieve pain. So no need to avoid movement altogether. Furthermore, exercises can promote tissue repair after tissue injury, or surgical repair of damaged tissues in the musculoskeletal system through a mechanism termed as mechanotherapy.

I am not in anyway saying that these so called passive treatments like heat, ultrasound, massages, manipulations, joint and soft tissue mobilizations, even kinesio taping have no place in physical therapy. Although evidences of the therapeutic effects of these modalities are weak at best, they can be in some cases they can be helpful. [Ok, so more and more orthopedic physical therapists are discarding their ultrasound machine, and for good reason]. I do spend a great deal of time doing hands-on therapy on my clients or patients prior to giving exercises. They can produce neurophysiological changes in the tissues to make movement drills easier and tolerable. For example, soft tissue work and joint mobilizations can help decrease pain, decrease muscle guarding, and increase range of movements. Exercises are then carried out to help maintain these improvements though activating the nervous system. That is why a good home exercise program, and adherence to these exercises are essential in the over all success of a physical therapy program.

So the next time your physiotherapist gives you only passive treatment without giving you exercises to do in the clinic and to do at home, you are hereby advised that you find another therapist.

gangnam

 

 

References:

A meta-analytic review of the hypoalgesic effects of exercise. Kelly M. Naugle, Roger B. Fillingim and Joseph L. Riley. 2012

Exercise as medicine – evidence for prescribing exercises as therapy in 26 different chronic diseases. B.K. Pedersen and B. Saltin. 2015

Mechanotherapy: how physical therapists’ prescription of exercises promotes tissue healing. K.M. Khan, A. Scott. 2009

Further Readings:

Placebo and nocebo effects in the neurological practice.